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NameDefinitionSourceTopicProduct ClassificationPeriodicityData NotesValuationCurrencyLast Updated
C
Commercial service exports (current US$)Commercial service exports are total service exports minus exports of government services not included elsewhere. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993) as the economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. Definitions may vary among reporting economies.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ExportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Commercial service imports (current US$)Commercial service imports are total service imports minus imports of government services not included elsewhere. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993) as the economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. Definitions may vary among reporting economies.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ImportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Communications, computer, etc. (% of service imports, BoP)Communications, computer, information, and other services cover international telecommunications; computer data; news-related service transactions between residents and nonresidents; construction services; royalties and license fees; miscellaneous business, professional, and technical services; personal, cultural, and recreational services; manufacturing services on physical inputs owned by others; and maintenance and repair services and government services not included elsewhere.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Computer, communications and other services (% of commercial service exports)Computer, communications and other services (% of commercial service exports) include such activities as international telecommunications, and postal and courier services; computer data; news-related service transactions between residents and nonresidents; construction services; royalties and license fees; miscellaneous business, professional, and technical services; and personal, cultural, and recreational services.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ExportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Computer, communications and other services (% of commercial service imports)Computer, communications and other services (% of commercial service imports) include such activities as international telecommunications, and postal and courier services; computer data; news-related service transactions between residents and nonresidents; construction services; royalties and license fees; miscellaneous business, professional, and technical services; and personal, cultural, and recreational services.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ImportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Cost to export (US$ per container)Cost measures the fees levied on a 20-foot container in U.S. dollars. All the fees associated with completing the procedures to export or import the goods are included. These include costs for documents, administrative fees for customs clearance and technical control, customs broker fees, terminal handling charges and inland transport. The cost measure does not include tariffs or trade taxes. Only official costs are recorded. Several assumptions are made for the business surveyed: Has 60 or more employees; Is located in the country's most populous city; Is a private, limited liability company. It does not operate within an export processing zone or an industrial estate with special export or import privileges; Is domestically owned with no foreign ownership; Exports more than 10% of its sales. Assumptions about the traded goods: The traded product travels in a dry-cargo, 20-foot, full container load. The product: Is not hazardous nor does it include military items; Does not require refrigeration or any other special environment; Does not require any special phytosanitary or environmental safety standards other than accepted international standards.World Bank, Doing Business project (http://www.doingbusiness.org/).Private Sector & Trade: Business environmentAnnualThe Doing Business report was first published in 2003 with five indicator sets measuring business regulation in 133 economies. The report has grown into an annual publication covering 11 indicator sets and 189 economies. In these 10 years Doing Business has recorded nearly 2,000 business regulation reforms in the areas covered by the indicators and researchers have produced well over 1,000 articles in peer-reviewed journals using the data published by Doing Business - work that helps explore many of the key development questions of our time. The Doing Business indicators points to important trends in regulatory reform and identifies the regions and economies making the biggest improvements for local entrepreneurs. It highlights both the areas of business regulation that have received the most attention and those where more progress remains to be made. The report also reviews research on which regulatory reforms have worked and how. Among the highlights are smarter business regulation supports economic growth, simpler business registration promotes greater entrepreneurship and firm productivity, while lower-cost registration improves formal employment opportunities, an effective regulatory environment boosts trade performance, and sound financial market infrastructure - courts, creditor and insolvency laws, and credit and collateral registries - improves access to credit.06-Nov-2014
Cost to import (US$ per container)Cost measures the fees levied on a 20-foot container in U.S. dollars. All the fees associated with completing the procedures to export or import the goods are included. These include costs for documents, administrative fees for customs clearance and technical control, customs broker fees, terminal handling charges and inland transport. The cost measure does not include tariffs or trade taxes. Only official costs are recorded.World Bank, Doing Business project (http://www.doingbusiness.org/).Private Sector & Trade: Business environmentAnnualThe Doing Business report was first published in 2003 with five indicator sets measuring business regulation in 133 economies. The report has grown into an annual publication covering 11 indicator sets and 189 economies. In these 10 years Doing Business has recorded nearly 2,000 business regulation reforms in the areas covered by the indicators and researchers have produced well over 1,000 articles in peer-reviewed journals using the data published by Doing Business - work that helps explore many of the key development questions of our time. The Doing Business indicators points to important trends in regulatory reform and identifies the regions and economies making the biggest improvements for local entrepreneurs. It highlights both the areas of business regulation that have received the most attention and those where more progress remains to be made. The report also reviews research on which regulatory reforms have worked and how. Among the highlights are smarter business regulation supports economic growth, simpler business registration promotes greater entrepreneurship and firm productivity, while lower-cost registration improves formal employment opportunities, an effective regulatory environment boosts trade performance, and sound financial market infrastructure - courts, creditor and insolvency laws, and credit and collateral registries - improves access to credit.06-Nov-2014
CPIA trade rating (1=low to 6=high)Trade assesses how the policy framework fosters trade in goods.World Bank Group, CPIA database (http://www.worldbank.org/ida).Public Sector: Policy & institutionsAnnualThe International Development Association (IDA) is the part of the World Bank Group that helps the poorest countries reduce poverty by providing concessional loans and grants for programs aimed at boosting economic growth and improving living conditions. IDA funding helps these countries deal with the complex challenges they face in meeting the Millennium Development Goals. The World Bank's IDA Resource Allocation Index (IRAI) is based on the results of the annual Country Policy and Institutional Assessment (CPIA) exercise, which covers the IDA-eligible countries. Country assessments have been carried out annually since the mid-1970s by World Bank staff. Over time the criteria have been revised from a largely macroeconomic focus to include governance aspects and a broader coverage of social and structural dimensions. Country performance is assessed against a set of 16 criteria grouped into four clusters: economic management, structural policies, policies for social inclusion and equity, and public sector management and institutions. IDA resources are allocated to a country on per capita terms based on its IDA country performance rating and, to a limited extent, based on its per capita gross national income. This ensures that good performers receive a higher IDA allocation in per capita terms. The IRAI is a key element in the country performance rating.06-Nov-2014
Customs and other import duties (% of tax revenue)Customs and other import duties are all levies collected on goods that are entering the country or services delivered by nonresidents to residents. They include levies imposed for revenue or protection purposes and determined on a specific or ad valorem basis as long as they are restricted to imported goods or services.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
D
Documents to export (number)All documents required per shipment to export goods are recorded. It is assumed that the contract has already been agreed upon and signed by both parties. Documents required for clearance by government ministries, customs authorities, port and container terminal authorities, health and technical control agencies and banks are taken into account. Since payment is by letter of credit, all documents required by banks for the issuance or securing of a letter of credit are also taken into account. Documents that are renewed annually and that do not require renewal per shipment (for example, an annual tax clearance certificate) are not included.World Bank, Doing Business project (http://www.doingbusiness.org/).Private Sector & Trade: Trade facilitationAnnualThe Doing Business report was first published in 2003 with five indicator sets measuring business regulation in 133 economies. The report has grown into an annual publication covering 11 indicator sets and 189 economies. In these 10 years Doing Business has recorded nearly 2,000 business regulation reforms in the areas covered by the indicators and researchers have produced well over 1,000 articles in peer-reviewed journals using the data published by Doing Business - work that helps explore many of the key development questions of our time. The Doing Business indicators points to important trends in regulatory reform and identifies the regions and economies making the biggest improvements for local entrepreneurs. It highlights both the areas of business regulation that have received the most attention and those where more progress remains to be made. The report also reviews research on which regulatory reforms have worked and how. Among the highlights are smarter business regulation supports economic growth, simpler business registration promotes greater entrepreneurship and firm productivity, while lower-cost registration improves formal employment opportunities, an effective regulatory environment boosts trade performance, and sound financial market infrastructure - courts, creditor and insolvency laws, and credit and collateral registries - improves access to credit.06-Nov-2014
Documents to import (number)All documents required per shipment to import goods are recorded. It is assumed that the contract has already been agreed upon and signed by both parties. Documents required for clearance by government ministries, customs authorities, port and container terminal authorities, health and technical control agencies and banks are taken into account. Since payment is by letter of credit, all documents required by banks for the issuance or securing of a letter of credit are also taken into account. Documents that are renewed annually and that do not require renewal per shipment (for example, an annual tax clearance certificate) are not included.World Bank, Doing Business project (http://www.doingbusiness.org/).Private Sector & Trade: Trade facilitationAnnualThe Doing Business report was first published in 2003 with five indicator sets measuring business regulation in 133 economies. The report has grown into an annual publication covering 11 indicator sets and 189 economies. In these 10 years Doing Business has recorded nearly 2,000 business regulation reforms in the areas covered by the indicators and researchers have produced well over 1,000 articles in peer-reviewed journals using the data published by Doing Business - work that helps explore many of the key development questions of our time. The Doing Business indicators points to important trends in regulatory reform and identifies the regions and economies making the biggest improvements for local entrepreneurs. It highlights both the areas of business regulation that have received the most attention and those where more progress remains to be made. The report also reviews research on which regulatory reforms have worked and how. Among the highlights are smarter business regulation supports economic growth, simpler business registration promotes greater entrepreneurship and firm productivity, while lower-cost registration improves formal employment opportunities, an effective regulatory environment boosts trade performance, and sound financial market infrastructure - courts, creditor and insolvency laws, and credit and collateral registries - improves access to credit.06-Nov-2014
E
Energy imports, net (% of energy use)Net energy imports are estimated as energy use less production, both measured in oil equivalents. A negative value indicates that the country is a net exporter. Energy use refers to use of primary energy before transformation to other end-use fuels, which is equal to indigenous production plus imports and stock changes, minus exports and fuels supplied to ships and aircraft engaged in international transport.International Energy Agency (IEA Statistics © OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp) and United Nations, Energy Statistics Yearbook.Environment: Energy production & useAnnualModern energy services are crucial to a country's economic development. Access to modern energy is essential for the provision of clean water, sanitation and healthcare and for the provision of reliable and efficient lighting, heating, cooking, mechanical power, and transport and telecommunications services. Governments in many countries are increasingly aware of the urgent need to make better use of the world's energy resources. Improved energy efficiency is often the most economic and readily available means of improving energy security and reducing greenhouse gas emissions.06-Nov-2014
Export value index (2000 = 100)Export values are the current value of exports (f.o.b.) converted to U.S. dollars and expressed as a percentage of the average for the base period (2000). UNCTAD's export value indexes are reported for most economies. For selected economies for which UNCTAD does not publish data, the export value indexes are derived from export volume indexes (line 72) and corresponding unit value indexes of exports (line 74) in the IMF's International Financial Statistics.United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Handbook of Statistics and data files, and International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics.Private Sector & Trade: Trade indexesAnnual06-Nov-2014
Export volume index (2000 = 100)Export volume indexes are derived from UNCTAD's volume index series and are the ratio of the export value indexes to the corresponding unit value indexes. Unit value indexes are based on data reported by countries that demonstrate consistency under UNCTAD quality controls, supplemented by UNCTAD’s estimates using the previous year’s trade values at the Standard International Trade Classification three-digit level as weights. To improve data coverage, especially for the latest periods, UNCTAD constructs a set of average prices indexes at the three-digit product classification of the Standard International Trade Classification revision 3 using UNCTAD’s Commodity Price Statistics, interna­tional and national sources, and UNCTAD secretariat estimates and calculates unit value indexes at the country level using the current year’s trade values as weights. For economies for which UNCTAD does not publish data, the export volume indexes (lines 72) in the IMF's International Financial Statistics are used.United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Handbook of Statistics and data files, and International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics.Private Sector & Trade: Trade indexesAnnual06-Nov-2014
Exports of goods and services (% of GDP)Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Shares of GDP & otherAnnual06-Nov-2014
Exports of goods and services (annual % growth)Annual growth rate of exports of goods and services based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2005 U.S. dollars. Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Growth ratesAnnual06-Nov-2014
Exports of goods and services (BoP, current US$)Exports of goods and services comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from residents to nonresidents of general merchandise, net exports of goods under merchanting, nonmonetary gold, and services. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnualThe balance of payments records an economy’s transactions with the rest of the world. Balance of payments accounts are divided into two groups: the current account, which records transactions in goods, services, primary income, and secondary income, and the capital and financial account, which records capital transfers, acquisition or disposal of nonproduced, nonfinancial assets, and transactions in financial assets and liabilities. The current account balance is one of the most analytically useful indicators of an external imbalance. A primary purpose of the balance of payments accounts is to indicate the need to adjust an external imbalance. Where to draw the line for analytical purposes requires a judgment concerning the imbalance that best indicates the need for adjustment. There are a number of definitions in common use for this and related analytical purposes. The trade balance is the difference between exports and imports of goods. From an analytical view it is arbitrary to distinguish goods from services. For example, a unit of foreign exchange earned by a freight company strengthens the balance of payments to the same extent as the foreign exchange earned by a goods exporter. Even so, the trade balance is useful because it is often the most timely indicator of trends in the current account balance. Customs authorities are typically able to provide data on trade in goods long before data on trade in services are available.06-Nov-2014
Exports of goods and services (constant 2005 US$)Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at constant 2005 prices: Expenditure on GDPAnnualAn economy's growth is measured by the change in the volume of its output or in the real incomes of its residents. The 2008 United Nations System of National Accounts (2008 SNA) offers three plausible indicators for calculating growth: the volume of gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income, and real gross national income. The volume of GDP is the sum of value added, measured at constant prices, by households, government, and industries operating in the economy. GDP accounts for all domestic production, regardless of whether the income accrues to domestic or foreign institutions.06-Nov-2014
Exports of goods and services (current US$)Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at current prices: Expenditure on GDPAnnual06-Nov-2014
Exports of goods, services and primary income (BoP, current US$)Exports of goods, services and primary income is the sum of goods exports, service exports and primary income receipts. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
G
GDP (constant 2005 US$)GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 2000 official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at constant 2005 prices: Aggregate indicatorsAnnualAn economy's growth is measured by the change in the volume of its output or in the real incomes of its residents. The 2008 United Nations System of National Accounts (2008 SNA) offers three plausible indicators for calculating growth: the volume of gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income, and real gross national income. The volume of GDP is the sum of value added, measured at constant prices, by households, government, and industries operating in the economy. GDP accounts for all domestic production, regardless of whether the income accrues to domestic or foreign institutions.06-Nov-2014
GDP (current US$)GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using single year official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at current prices: Aggregate indicatorsAnnual06-Nov-2014
GDP growth (annual %)Annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2005 U.S. dollars. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Growth ratesAnnualAn economy's growth is measured by the change in the volume of its output or in the real incomes of its residents. The 2008 United Nations System of National Accounts (2008 SNA) offers three plausible indicators for calculating growth: the volume of gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income, and real gross national income. The volume of GDP is the sum of value added, measured at constant prices, by households, government, and industries operating in the economy. GDP accounts for all domestic production, regardless of whether the income accrues to domestic or foreign institutions.06-Nov-2014
GDP per capita (constant 2005 US$)GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at constant 2005 prices: Aggregate indicatorsAnnual06-Nov-2014
GDP per capita (current US$)GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at current prices: Aggregate indicatorsAnnual06-Nov-2014
GDP per capita growth (annual %)Annual percentage growth rate of GDP per capita based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2005 U.S. dollars. GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Growth ratesAnnual06-Nov-2014
GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $)GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2011 international dollars.World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnual06-Nov-2014
GDP per capita, PPP (current international $)GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars based on the 2011 ICP round.World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnual06-Nov-2014
GDP, PPP (constant 2011 international $)PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2011 international dollars.World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnual06-Nov-2014
GDP, PPP (current international $)PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars. For most economies PPP figures are extrapolated from the 2011 International Comparison Program (ICP) benchmark estimates or imputed using a statistical model based on the 2011 ICP. For 47 high- and upper middle-income economies conversion factors are provided by Eurostat and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnual06-Nov-2014
GNI (constant 2005 US$)GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at constant 2005 prices: Aggregate indicatorsAnnualBecause development encompasses many factors - economic, environmental, cultural, educational, and institutional - no single measure gives a complete picture. However, the total earnings of the residents of an economy, measured by its gross national income (GNI), is a good measure of its capacity to provide for the well-being of its people.06-Nov-2014
GNI (current US$)GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at current prices: Aggregate indicatorsAnnualBecause development encompasses many factors - economic, environmental, cultural, educational, and institutional - no single measure gives a complete picture. However, the total earnings of the residents of an economy, measured by its gross national income (GNI), is a good measure of its capacity to provide for the well-being of its people.06-Nov-2014
GNI growth (annual %)GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Growth rates:Annual06-Nov-2014
GNI per capita (constant 2005 US$)GNI per capita is gross national income divided by midyear population. GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at constant 2005 prices: Aggregate indicatorsAnnual06-Nov-2014
GNI per capita growth (annual %)Annual percentage growth rate of GNI per capita based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2005 U.S. dollars. GNI per capita is gross national income divided by midyear population. GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Growth rates:Annual06-Nov-2014
GNI per capita, Atlas method (current US$)GNI per capita (formerly GNP per capita) is the gross national income, converted to U.S. dollars using the World Bank Atlas method, divided by the midyear population. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro area, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Atlas GNI & GNI per capitaAnnual06-Nov-2014
GNI per capita, PPP (constant 2011 international $)GNI per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GNI is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in constant 2011 international dollars.World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnual06-Nov-2014
GNI per capita, PPP (current international $)GNI per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GNI is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars based on the 2011 ICP round.World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnual06-Nov-2014
GNI, PPP (constant 2011 international $)PPP GNI (formerly PPP GNP) is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. Gross national income is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in constant 2011 international dollars.World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnual06-Nov-2014
GNI, PPP (current international $)PPP GNI (formerly PPP GNP) is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. Gross national income is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars. For most economies PPP figures are extrapolated from the 2011 International Comparison Program (ICP) benchmark estimates or imputed using a statistical model based on the 2011 ICP. For 47 high- and upper middle-income economies conversion factors are provided by Eurostat and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).World Bank, International Comparison Program database.Economic Policy & Debt: Purchasing power parityAnnualBecause development encompasses many factors - economic, environmental, cultural, educational, and institutional - no single measure gives a complete picture. However, the total earnings of the residents of an economy, measured by its gross national income (GNI), is a good measure of its capacity to provide for the well-being of its people.06-Nov-2014
Goods exports (BoP, current US$)Goods exports refer to all movable goods (including nonmonetary gold and net exports of goods under merchanting) involved in a change of ownership from residents to nonresidents. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Goods imports (BoP, current US$)Goods imports refer to all movable goods (including nonmonetary gold) involved in a change of ownership from nonresidents to residents. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
I
ICT service exports (% of service exports, BoP)Information and communication technology service exports include computer and communications services (telecommunications and postal and courier services) and information services (computer data and news-related service transactions).International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Infrastructure: CommunicationsAnnualThe balance of payments records an economy's transactions with the rest of the world. Balance of payments accounts are divided into two groups: the current account, which records transactions in goods, services, income, and current transfers, and the capital and financial account, which records capital transfers, acquisition or disposal of non-produced, nonfinancial assets, and transactions in financial assets and liabilities.06-Nov-2014
ICT service exports (BoP, current US$)Information and communication technology service exports include computer and communications services (telecommunications and postal and courier services) and information services (computer data and news-related service transactions). Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Infrastructure: CommunicationsAnnual06-Nov-2014
Import value index (2000 = 100)Import value indexes are the current value of imports (c.i.f.) converted to U.S. dollars and expressed as a percentage of the average for the base period (2000). UNCTAD's import value indexes are reported for most economies. For selected economies for which UNCTAD does not publish data, the import value indexes are derived from import volume indexes (line 73) and corresponding unit value indexes of imports (line 75) in the IMF's International Financial Statistics.United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Handbook of Statistics and data files, and International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics.Private Sector & Trade: Trade indexesAnnual06-Nov-2014
Import volume index (2000 = 100)Import volume indexes are derived from UNCTAD's volume index series and are the ratio of the import value indexes to the corresponding unit value indexes. Unit value indexes are based on data reported by countries that demonstrate consistency under UNCTAD quality controls, supplemented by UNCTAD’s estimates using the previous year’s trade values at the Standard International Trade Classification three-digit level as weights. To improve data coverage, especially for the latest periods, UNCTAD constructs a set of average prices indexes at the three-digit product classification of the Standard International Trade Classification revision 3 using UNCTAD’s Commodity Price Statistics, interna­tional and national sources, and UNCTAD secretariat estimates and calculates unit value indexes at the country level using the current year’s trade values as weights. For economies for which UNCTAD does not publish data, the import volume indexes (lines 73) in the IMF's International Financial Statistics are used.United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Handbook of Statistics and data files, and International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics.Private Sector & Trade: Trade indexesAnnual06-Nov-2014
Imports of goods and services (% of GDP)Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Shares of GDP & otherAnnual06-Nov-2014
Imports of goods and services (annual % growth)Annual growth rate of imports of goods and services based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2005 U.S. dollars. Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Growth ratesAnnual06-Nov-2014
Imports of goods and services (BoP, current US$)Imports of goods and services comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from nonresidents to residents of general merchandise, nonmonetary gold, and services. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnualThe balance of payments records an economy’s transactions with the rest of the world. Balance of payments accounts are divided into two groups: the current account, which records transactions in goods, services, primary income, and secondary income, and the capital and financial account, which records capital transfers, acquisition or disposal of nonproduced, nonfinancial assets, and transactions in financial assets and liabilities. The current account balance is one of the most analytically useful indicators of an external imbalance. A primary purpose of the balance of payments accounts is to indicate the need to adjust an external imbalance. Where to draw the line for analytical purposes requires a judgment concerning the imbalance that best indicates the need for adjustment. There are a number of definitions in common use for this and related analytical purposes. The trade balance is the difference between exports and imports of goods. From an analytical view it is arbitrary to distinguish goods from services. For example, a unit of foreign exchange earned by a freight company strengthens the balance of payments to the same extent as the foreign exchange earned by a goods exporter. Even so, the trade balance is useful because it is often the most timely indicator of trends in the current account balance. Customs authorities are typically able to provide data on trade in goods long before data on trade in services are available.06-Nov-2014
Imports of goods and services (constant 2005 US$)Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at constant 2005 prices: Expenditure on GDPAnnualAn economy's growth is measured by the change in the volume of its output or in the real incomes of its residents. The 2008 United Nations System of National Accounts (2008 SNA) offers three plausible indicators for calculating growth: the volume of gross domestic product (GDP), real gross domestic income, and real gross national income. The volume of GDP is the sum of value added, measured at constant prices, by households, government, and industries operating in the economy. GDP accounts for all domestic production, regardless of whether the income accrues to domestic or foreign institutions.06-Nov-2014
Imports of goods and services (current US$)Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: US$ at current prices: Expenditure on GDPAnnual06-Nov-2014
Imports of goods, services and primary income (BoP, current US$)Imports of goods, services and primary income is the sum of goods imports, service imports and primary income payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Insurance and financial services (% of commercial service exports)Insurance and financial services cover freight insurance on goods exported and other direct insurance such as life insurance; financial intermediation services such as commissions, foreign exchange transactions, and brokerage services; and auxiliary services such as financial market operational and regulatory services.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ExportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Insurance and financial services (% of commercial service imports)Insurance and financial services cover freight insurance on goods imported and other direct insurance such as life insurance; financial intermediation services such as commissions, foreign exchange transactions, and brokerage services; and auxiliary services such as financial market operational and regulatory services.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ImportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
International tourism, expenditures (% of total imports)International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries, including payments to foreign carriers for international transport. These expenditures may include those by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are important enough to justify separate classification. For some countries they do not include expenditures for passenger transport items. Their share in imports is calculated as a ratio to imports of goods and services, which comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from nonresidents to residents of general merchandise, goods sent for processing and repairs, nonmonetary gold, and services.World Tourism Organization, Yearbook of Tourism Statistics, Compendium of Tourism Statistics and data files, and IMF and World Bank imports estimates.Private Sector & Trade: Travel & tourismAnnualTourism is officially recognized as a directly measurable activity, enabling more accurate analysis and more effective policy. Whereas previously the sector relied mostly on approximations from related areas of measurement (e.g. Balance of Payments statistics), tourism today possesses a range of instruments to track its productive activities and the activities of the consumers that drive them: visitors (both tourists and excursionists). An increasing number of countries have opened up and invested in tourism development, making tourism a key driver of socio-economic progress through export revenues, the creation of jobs and enterprises, and infrastructure development. As an internationally traded service, inbound tourism has become one of the world's major trade categories. For many developing countries it is one of the main sources of foreign exchange income and a major component of exports, creating much needed employment and development opportunities. This measure reflects the importance of tourism as an internationally traded service relative to other categories of imports. Such a measure reveals the predilection for tourism in a country's import structure and the relative degree of an economy's domestic revenue outflows due to international tourism.06-Nov-2014
International tourism, receipts (% of total exports)International tourism receipts are expenditures by international inbound visitors, including payments to national carriers for international transport. These receipts include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except when these are important enough to justify separate classification. For some countries they do not include receipts for passenger transport items. Their share in exports is calculated as a ratio to exports of goods and services, which comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from residents to nonresidents of general merchandise, goods sent for processing and repairs, nonmonetary gold, and services.World Tourism Organization, Yearbook of Tourism Statistics, Compendium of Tourism Statistics and data files, and IMF and World Bank exports estimates.Private Sector & Trade: Travel & tourismAnnualTourism is officially recognized as a directly measurable activity, enabling more accurate analysis and more effective policy. Whereas previously the sector relied mostly on approximations from related areas of measurement (e.g. Balance of Payments statistics), tourism today possesses a range of instruments to track its productive activities and the activities of the consumers that drive them: visitors (both tourists and excursionists). An increasing number of countries have opened up and invested in tourism development, making tourism a key driver of socio-economic progress through export revenues, the creation of jobs and enterprises, and infrastructure development. As an internationally traded service, inbound tourism has become one of the world's major trade categories. For many developing countries it is one of the main sources of foreign exchange income and a major component of exports, creating much needed employment and development opportunities. This measure reflects the importance of tourism as an internationally traded service relative to other categories of exports. Such a measure reveals the degree of tourism specialization in a country's export structure and the relative capability of tourism in generating foreign revenues.06-Nov-2014
M
Merchandise trade (% of GDP)Merchandise trade as a share of GDP is the sum of merchandise exports and imports divided by the value of GDP, all in current U.S. dollars.World Trade Organization, and World Bank GDP estimates.Private Sector & Trade: Total merchandise tradeAnnual06-Nov-2014
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Net barter terms of trade index (2000 = 100)Net barter terms of trade index is calculated as the percentage ratio of the export unit value indexes to the import unit value indexes, measured relative to the base year 2000. Unit value indexes are based on data reported by countries that demonstrate consistency under UNCTAD quality controls, supplemented by UNCTAD's estimates using the previous year’s trade values at the Standard International Trade Classification three-digit level as weights. To improve data coverage, especially for the latest periods, UNCTAD constructs a set of average prices indexes at the three-digit product classification of the Standard International Trade Classification revision 3 using UNCTAD’s Commodity Price Statistics, interna­tional and national sources, and UNCTAD secretariat estimates and calculates unit value indexes at the country level using the current year's trade values as weights.United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Handbook of Statistics and data files, and International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics.Private Sector & Trade: Trade indexesAnnualData on international trade in goods are available from each country's balance of payments and customs records. While the balance of payments focuses on the financial transactions that accompany trade, customs data record the direction of trade and the physical quantities and value of goods entering or leaving the customs area. Customs data may differ from data recorded in the balance of payments because of differences in valuation and time of recording. The 2008 United Nations System of National Accounts and the sixth edition of the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) Balance of Payments Manual attempted to reconcile definitions and reporting standards for international trade statistics, but differences in sources, timing, and national practices limit comparability. Real growth rates derived from trade volume indexes and terms of trade based on unit price indexes may therefore differ from those derived from national accounts aggregates. Trade in goods, or merchandise trade, includes all goods that add to or subtract from an economy's material resources. Trade data are collected on the basis of a country's customs area, which in most cases is the same as its geographic area. Goods provided as part of foreign aid are included, but goods destined for extraterritorial agencies (such as embassies) are not. By international agreement customs data are reported to the United Nations Statistics Division, which maintains the Commodity Trade (Comtrade) and Monthly Bulletin of Statistics databases. The United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) compiles international trade statistics, including price, value, and volume indexes, from national and international sources such as the IMF’s International Financial Statistics database, the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Japan Customs, Bank of Japan, and UNCTAD’s Commodity Price Statistics and Merchandise Trade Matrix. The IMF also compiles data on trade prices and volumes in its International Financial Statistics (IFS) database.06-Nov-2014
Net trade in goods (BoP, current US$)Net trade in goods is the difference between exports and imports of goods. Trade in services is not included. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: BalancesAnnual06-Nov-2014
Net trade in goods and services (BoP, current US$)Net trade in goods and services is derived by offsetting imports of goods and services against exports of goods and services. Exports and imports of goods and services comprise all transactions involving a change of ownership of goods and services between residents of one country and the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: BalancesAnnual06-Nov-2014
P
Population, totalTotal population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country of asylum, who are generally considered part of the population of their country of origin. The values shown are midyear estimates.(1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (Health: Population: StructureAnnualIncreases in human population, whether a result of immigration or more births than deaths, can place pressures on the country's sustainability through impacts on many natural resources and social infrastructure. A significant increase in population will negatively impact availability of land for agricultural production, and will put increased demands on food, energy, water, social services, and infrastructure. On the other hand, decreasing population size - a result of fewer births than deaths, and people moving out of a country - can impact government's commitment to maintain services and infrastructure.06-Nov-2014
S
Service exports (BoP, current US$)Services refer to economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Service imports (BoP, current US$)Services refer to economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. Data are in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
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Taxes on exports (% of tax revenue)Taxes on exports are all levies on goods being transported out of the country or services being delivered to nonresidents by residents. Rebates on exported goods that are repayments of previously paid general consumption taxes, excise taxes, or import duties are deducted from the gross amounts receivable from these taxes, not from amounts receivable from export taxes.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
Taxes on exports (current LCU)Taxes on exports are all levies on goods being transported out of the country or services being delivered to nonresidents by residents. Rebates on exported goods that are repayments of previously paid general consumption taxes, excise taxes, or import duties are deducted from the gross amounts receivable from these taxes, not from amounts receivable from export taxes.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
Taxes on goods and services (% of revenue)Taxes on goods and services include general sales and turnover or value added taxes, selective excises on goods, selective taxes on services, taxes on the use of goods or property, taxes on extraction and production of minerals, and profits of fiscal monopolies.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
Taxes on goods and services (% value added of industry and services)Taxes on goods and services include general sales and turnover or value added taxes, selective excises on goods, selective taxes on services, taxes on the use of goods or property, taxes on extraction and production of minerals, and profits of fiscal monopolies.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files, and World Bank and OECD value added estimates.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
Taxes on goods and services (current LCU)Taxes on goods and services include general sales and turnover or value added taxes, selective excises on goods, selective taxes on services, taxes on the use of goods or property, taxes on extraction and production of minerals, and profits of fiscal monopolies.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
Taxes on international trade (% of revenue)Taxes on international trade include import duties, export duties, profits of export or import monopolies, exchange profits, and exchange taxes.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
Taxes on international trade (current LCU)Taxes on international trade include import duties, export duties, profits of export or import monopolies, exchange profits, and exchange taxes.International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.Public Sector: Government finance: RevenueAnnual06-Nov-2014
Time to export (days)Time to export is the time necessary to comply with all procedures required to export goods. Time is recorded in calendar days. The time calculation for a procedure starts from the moment it is initiated and runs until it is completed. If a procedure can be accelerated for an additional cost, the fastest legal procedure is chosen. It is assumed that neither the exporter nor the importer wastes time and that each commits to completing each remaining procedure without delay. Procedures that can be completed in parallel are measured as simultaneous. The waiting time between procedures--for example, during unloading of the cargo--is included in the measure.World Bank, Doing Business project (http://www.doingbusiness.org/).Private Sector & Trade: Trade facilitationAnnualThe Doing Business report was first published in 2003 with five indicator sets measuring business regulation in 133 economies. The report has grown into an annual publication covering 11 indicator sets and 189 economies. In these 10 years Doing Business has recorded nearly 2,000 business regulation reforms in the areas covered by the indicators and researchers have produced well over 1,000 articles in peer-reviewed journals using the data published by Doing Business - work that helps explore many of the key development questions of our time. The Doing Business indicators points to important trends in regulatory reform and identifies the regions and economies making the biggest improvements for local entrepreneurs. It highlights both the areas of business regulation that have received the most attention and those where more progress remains to be made. The report also reviews research on which regulatory reforms have worked and how. Among the highlights are smarter business regulation supports economic growth, simpler business registration promotes greater entrepreneurship and firm productivity, while lower-cost registration improves formal employment opportunities, an effective regulatory environment boosts trade performance, and sound financial market infrastructure - courts, creditor and insolvency laws, and credit and collateral registries - improves access to credit.06-Nov-2014
Time to import (days)Time to import is the time necessary to comply with all procedures required to import goods. Time is recorded in calendar days. The time calculation for a procedure starts from the moment it is initiated and runs until it is completed. If a procedure can be accelerated for an additional cost, the fastest legal procedure is chosen. It is assumed that neither the exporter nor the importer wastes time and that each commits to completing each remaining procedure without delay. Procedures that can be completed in parallel are measured as simultaneous. The waiting time between procedures--for example, during unloading of the cargo--is included in the measure.World Bank, Doing Business project (http://www.doingbusiness.org/).Private Sector & Trade: Trade facilitationAnnualThe Doing Business report was first published in 2003 with five indicator sets measuring business regulation in 133 economies. The report has grown into an annual publication covering 11 indicator sets and 189 economies. In these 10 years Doing Business has recorded nearly 2,000 business regulation reforms in the areas covered by the indicators and researchers have produced well over 1,000 articles in peer-reviewed journals using the data published by Doing Business - work that helps explore many of the key development questions of our time. The Doing Business indicators points to important trends in regulatory reform and identifies the regions and economies making the biggest improvements for local entrepreneurs. It highlights both the areas of business regulation that have received the most attention and those where more progress remains to be made. The report also reviews research on which regulatory reforms have worked and how. Among the highlights are smarter business regulation supports economic growth, simpler business registration promotes greater entrepreneurship and firm productivity, while lower-cost registration improves formal employment opportunities, an effective regulatory environment boosts trade performance, and sound financial market infrastructure - courts, creditor and insolvency laws, and credit and collateral registries - improves access to credit.06-Nov-2014
Trade (% of GDP)Trade is the sum of exports and imports of goods and services measured as a share of gross domestic product.World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.Economic Policy & Debt: National accounts: Shares of GDP & otherAnnual06-Nov-2014
Trade in services (% of GDP)Trade in services is the sum of service exports and imports divided by the value of GDP, all in current U.S. dollars.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files, and World Bank and OECD GDP estimates.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Transport services (% of commercial service exports)Transport services (% of commercial service exports) covers all transport services (sea, air, land, internal waterway, space, and pipeline) performed by residents of one economy for those of another and involving the carriage of passengers, movement of goods (freight), rental of carriers with crew, and related support and auxiliary services. Excluded are freight insurance, which is included in insurance services; goods procured in ports by nonresident carriers and repairs of transport equipment, which are included in goods; repairs of railway facilities, harbors, and airfield facilities, which are included in construction services; and rental of carriers without crew, which is included in other services.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ExportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Transport services (% of commercial service imports)Transport services (% of commercial service imports) covers all transport services (sea, air, land, internal waterway, space, and pipeline) performed by residents of one economy for those of another and involving the carriage of passengers, movement of goods (freight), rental of carriers with crew, and related support and auxiliary services. Excluded are freight insurance, which is included in insurance services; goods procured in ports by nonresident carriers and repairs of transport equipment, which are included in goods; repairs of railway facilities, harbors, and airfield facilities, which are included in construction services; and rental of carriers without crew, which is included in other services.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ImportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Transport services (% of service exports, BoP)Transport covers all transport services (sea, air, land, internal waterway, pipeline, space and electricity transmission) performed by residents of one economy for those of another and involving the carriage of passengers, the movement of goods (freight), rental of carriers with crew, and related support and auxiliary services. Also included are postal and courier services. Excluded are freight insurance (included in insurance services); goods procured in ports by nonresident carriers (included in goods); maintenance and repairs on transport equipment (included in maintenance and repair services n.i.e.); and repairs of railway facilities, harbors, and airfield facilities (included in construction).International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Transport services (% of service imports, BoP)Transport covers all transport services (sea, air, land, internal waterway, pipeline, space and electricity transmission) performed by residents of one economy for those of another and involving the carriage of passengers, the movement of goods (freight), rental of carriers with crew, and related support and auxiliary services. Also included are postal and courier services. Excluded are freight insurance (included in insurance services); goods procured in ports by nonresident carriers (included in goods); maintenance and repairs on transport equipment (included in maintenance and repair services n.i.e.); and repairs of railway facilities, harbors, and airfield facilities (included in construction).International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Travel services (% of commercial service exports)Travel services (% of commercial service exports) covers goods and services acquired from an economy by travelers in that economy for their own use during visits of less than one year for business or personal purposes. Travel services include the goods and services consumed by travelers, such as lodging and meals and transport (within the economy visited).International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ExportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Travel services (% of commercial service imports)Travel services (% of commercial service imports) covers goods and services acquired from an economy by travelers in that economy for their own use during visits of less than one year for business or personal purposes. Travel services include the goods and services consumed by travelers, such as lodging, meals, and transport (within the economy visited).International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Private Sector & Trade: ImportsAnnualTrade in services differs from trade in goods because services are produced and consumed at the same time. Thus services to a traveler may be consumed in the producing country (for example, use of a hotel room) but are classified as imports of the traveler's country. In other cases services may be supplied from a remote location; for example, insurance services may be supplied from one location and consumed in another.06-Nov-2014
Travel services (% of service exports, BoP)Travel covers goods and services acquired from an economy by travelers for their own use during visits of less than one year in that economy for either business or personal purposes. Travel includes local transport (i.e., transport within the economy being visited and provided by a resident of that economy), but excludes international transport (which is included in passenger transport. Travel also excludes goods for resale, which are included in general merchandise.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014
Travel services (% of service imports, BoP)Travel covers goods and services acquired from an economy by travelers for their own use during visits of less than one year in that economy for either business or personal purposes. Travel includes local transport (i.e., transport within the economy being visited and provided by a resident of that economy), but excludes international transport (which is included in passenger transport. Travel also excludes goods for resale, which are included in general merchandise.International Monetary Fund, Balance of Payments Statistics Yearbook and data files.Economic Policy & Debt: Balance of payments: Current account: Goods, services & incomeAnnual06-Nov-2014